Admissions

Jen Adams writes.

nevver:

Cutters, Tito Mouraz

…, you are the….

I’m not happy when I’m writing, but I’m more unhappy when I’m not.

Fannie Hurst, author of BACK STREET (via vintageanchorbooks)

It takes a lot of time to be a genius. You have to sit around so much, doing nothing, really doing nothing.

Gertrude Stein, Everybody’s Autobiography (via vintageanchorbooks)

wanderingnewyork:

A passageway at the 190th Street-Overlook Terrace Station on the A Line

Somebody call Kubrick, quick. 

wanderingnewyork:

A passageway at the 190th Street-Overlook Terrace Station on the A Line

Somebody call Kubrick, quick. 

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

Faulty Stars

From the New York Times review of the film adaptation of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars:

"Though it is a tragic love story, it is also a perfect and irresistible fantasy. Hazel and Gus possess an absolute moral authority, an ability to assert the truth of their experience that few can share and many might covet. They know the meaning of their own lives, and try as it might, the movie can’t help but give cancer credit for this state of perfection. There is something disturbing about that, and also, therefore, about the source of some of the tears the movie calls forth. The loudest weeping you hear — including your own — may arise not from grief or admiration, but from envy."

I had cancer. I have been in full remission for over five years, and I lost a year of my life to chemo and CAT scans, wigs and tears. I’ve got scars on scars, inside and out. However, I have not read this book, nor do I intend to. I have not seen this film, nor do I want to. But I’m heartened: if TFIOS manages to put forth the idea that suffering a horrible, stupid, meaningless, agonizing, deadly disease can actually be a vehicle for understanding the meaning of one’s life, and even inspires envy in those who have not had this experience, then good. Good. It gets tiring trying to explain how retreating into pat platitudes about “God’s will” and “fighting the battle” only diminishes the lasting effect it can have on you. The only way out is through, and facing an enemy squarely, acknowledging the unfairness and randomness and seizing the bits of beauty to be found therein is the way to win. Any battle. 

It may be that the prospect of a true trial by fire is too terrifying for most. That’s fine. Maybe being “brave” isn’t the way through. Maybe letting yourself be terrified, letting parts of you die, is the way to truly thrive, instead. You should all be so lucky. 

wanderingnewyork:

Houses in Grasmere.

Oh, honey pie…

wanderingnewyork:

Houses in Grasmere.

Oh, honey pie…

nevver:

OK

Sometimes this happens. You will be ok.

nevver:

OK

Sometimes this happens. You will be ok.

nevver:

On a scale…

What if he says 5?

nevver:

On a scale

What if he says 5?

(Source: twitter.com)

nprontheroad:

Australian snowboarder Torah Bright let me hold her Olympic silver medal. It’s heavy.

This is one thing Sochi got right. Gorgeous design. I love the filigree detail at the edge—just a little trace of the ancient along with all that’s modern. Well done!

nprontheroad:

Australian snowboarder Torah Bright let me hold her Olympic silver medal. It’s heavy.

This is one thing Sochi got right. Gorgeous design. I love the filigree detail at the edge—just a little trace of the ancient along with all that’s modern. Well done!

(via npr)

New York friends, come and see another of Grosse’s pieces installed in the courtyard spaces along Myrtle Promenade at Jay Street/Metrotech. They look amazing protruding through the snow!

massmoca:

therhumboogie:

By Katharina Grosse, these huge, beautiful sculptural installations utilise their environment by being painted in situ making each set-up entirely unique. I feel torn between thinking of a martian landscape, or a Lovecraftian fifth dimension. 

Love these Katharina shots of her One Floor Up More Highly show in our Building 5.

(Source: mymodernmet.com, via npr)

I keep hoping. 

I keep hoping. 

(Source: screenshotsofdespair, via burkesbricolage)

nevver:

Common People, the Comic

(Source: forbiddenplanet.co.uk)